An Online Art Gallery Featuring Hawkesbury Art Galleries and Artists.

The Hawkesbury Valley

The fertile Hawkesbury Valley was discovered in July 1789 by Governor Phillip while seeking fertile land for food production of the embryonic settlement of Sydney. In 1794 the first official land grant was of 30 acres each to 22 settlers. The Hawkesbury Valley was the frontier of Australia until 1814, when William Cox built the road to the West. With no roads suited to vehicular traffic until 1797, boats journeyed the river transporting produce to Sydney Cove and returning with supplies and equipment for the new settlers. Windsor, Richmond, Pitt Town, Wilberforce and Castlereagh, the Five Macquarie Towns, were named by Governor Macquarie in 1810. Two Hundred years later the bounty, rural beauty, historic buildings and Aboriginal Darug tribe heritage can be experienced and enjoyed through the work of our talented local Artists and Artisans.

ENJOY Cultural Expression

The Hawkesbury's cultural expression has traditionally been driven by volunteer groups and a small band of professionals aided by modest council support. In the early 1990's a self-guided Artists Trail was produced which identified the sites that various Australian Artists have rendered of the region, the most famous of which was Arthur Streeton’s landscape of the Hawkesbury River called "The Purple Noon's Transparent Might". A number of our local artists have expressed that being able to live so close to the inspiration for this work is an inspiration for them. The Hawkesbury Regional Gallery, opened in June 2005, sites as one of its key guiding principles "…the changing array of exhibitions is to uphold the Hawkesbury's artistic and creative heritage while showcasing the new and original from around Australia." The cultural identity of the Hawkesbury continues to be shaped by the energy, imagination and enthusiasm of its amateur and professional artists.